Books for Hufflepuffs

book-review-3

Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Thoughts on Tomes and created by Lainey @ Ginger Reads Lainey. You can check out the group’s Goodreads page for this month’s topics!

Hufflepuff.png

This week’s topic is books that represent your Hogwarts house – for me, that’s Hufflepuff. Though I admittedly look awful in yellow, I’m a proud badger! The listed choices for this week are in no particular order.

watership-down

Watership Down
As a kid I couldn’t get enough of this harrowing tale of friendship and survival. As an adult, I try to re-read it once every few years. This book shook me to my core the first time I read it. The rabbits keep on keeping on, despite all odds. What’s more Hufflepuff than that?

AsterixAsterix

That’s right, this is on the list. I grew up reading these (je suis franco-ontarienne) and love them to this day. These BD’s about a small village’s refusal of the Roman occupation is still laugh out loud funny – especially all those name puns. Asterix and Obelix have an exceptional friendship, and the resistance of their village to being conquered is earmarked by stubbornness and good humour that is characteristic of Hufflepuffs. Plus, they love a good feast!

sookie stackhouse.png

The Southern Vampire Mysteries

I loved these books. I sped through them faster than you’d believe (and no, I haven’t seen the show). They’re on the list because Sookie is for sure a Hufflepuff. She’s just trying to live her life and all this bizarre stuff is happening around her. What does she do? Takes it in stride, ’cause that’s life. Also, she’s a romantic who really does not react well to betrayal. Why? Because she’s a hella loyal badger.

maresi-cover

Maresi

A simple story told in a fairy-tale style, I really enjoyed this book. The first in a series, it follows the burgeoning friendship of two girls, Maresi and Jai. They live in the Red Abbey, a haven for females as it is forbidden for men to set food on the island. It’s a story of loyalty, community, magic, and sacrifice. Hufflepuffs can be brave, clever, and sneaky when they have to but the driving factors are always loyalty and friendship. This story has that in spades. redwall.jpg

Redwall Series

Literally all of these books capture what it means to be a Hufflepuff. The peaceful beasts of Redwall abbey extend aid to all those who ask, and live quiet lives of plenty. They live as a community with shared values and goals, and when threatened they’ll take up arms to defend their lives, though they mostly abhor violence. In far away Salamandastron there live warrior badgers who are capable of entering berserker rages and decimating throngs of vermin foes – but who live as benevolent overseers of the hares of the long patrol unless absolutely necessary. That is about as Hufflepuff as anything could ever be. Also, there are feasts. Because again, we’re ‘Puffs.

That’s all for T5W this week! Have you checked out any of the books on my list? Do you have other suggestions for Hufflepuff reads, or for books that suit your Hogwarts House? Let me know in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

 

 

T5W: Books to Re-Read

book-review-3

It’s Wednesday, and you know what that means – time for another Top 5 Wednesday! T5W is a weekly book meme created by Gingerreadslainey, and hosted here if you’re interested in participating!

This week we’re talking about books that we want to re-read! A topic that’s certainly near and dear to me, as I re-read books fairly consistently. While reading a book once is very rewarding, reading it again can bring so much more to the story. With each re-read, I believe a deeper understanding of the text can be achieved – of the characters, their motives, the subtle nuances the author worked in – and even of error and offenses that you never noticed the first time around.

Plus, it’s always wonderful to return to a world and characters that you love. Like sinking into a warm bath, or under soft flannel sheets, it’s a feeling of comfort that warms you.

So what are my top five books to re-read? In no particular order, lets begin!

Watership Down

watership-down

I first read this when I was fairly young – maybe about 11 or 12 years old. While I loved it as a kid, I’m sure there are things that I never quite understood about it. I think I’ll definitely benefit from reading it again as an adult. Plus, I’ve since learned that it was the author’s least favourite of his own works which is interesting and may lend a more critical eye during the re-read.

Inheritance Cycle

inheritance-cycle

A series that I loved as a teen, I nevertheless recognised at the time that the writing in the first few books was a rather poor emulation of fantasy novels that had come before. Despite that, I enjoyed the fast pacing and characterisations set in this new-ish fantasy setting. I’m curious to see if I’ll like these less in a re-read as an adult, considering that I used to do fast re-reads of them and would skip the parts I enjoyed less.

Amos Daragon

The only French titles on the list, these were favourites of mine as a kid. I’m fairly sure you can also get them in English (the series title would be ‘The Mask Wearer’) but a beautiful omnibus set came into my work in the original French and I’m making sure to snatch it up quickly. Amos Daragon’s adventures were thrilling, and the cast of characters were super interesting and included a young gorgon and a kid who could turn into a bear. Honestly, I think I’ll love these even more with a re-read, and they’ll help me become more comfortable with my French again.

The Fionavar Tapestry

fionavar-tapestry

These books changed my life. They changed my perspective of fantasy, of the concept of alternate universes, and of how complex characters could be. I read them when I was about 14, and I’m far overdue on a re-read. Kay is a singularly gifted author. His beautiful prose builds his worlds with an effortless grace that I believe to be honestly unmatched by anyone else. (My love of this series only increased when I met Guy Gavriel Kay and he was kind enough to take a picture with me.)

The Gemma Doyle Trilogy

gemma-doyle

I really enjoyed these books as a teen. Portraying a magical world that was more insidious than most I had previously encountered, I found them very compelling. Even as a teen though, I wasn’t a fan of the romance in these books. However, the mysterious nature of the settings, and many of the characters kept me guessing and wanting more. I also found the tragedies of some characters pretty unique among a whole lot of ‘feel good happy ending’ stories at the time. I’m eager to see how these books hold up on a re-read.

So there you have it! Five books (or series) that I’m eager to re-read.

Are any of these on your to-read list? Have you read any of them before? Did you love them, hate them, or forget about them? What are you planning on re-reading? Let me know in the comments below!