Moshi Moshi

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August has arrived, and with it Women in Translation month. While there are several different events this month, I’m participating in Tamsien’s (Babbling Books) photography and reading challenge which you can find on her instagram.

I went through my bookshelves to find translated titles, but didn’t turn up many as I generally avoid translated works on purpose. (More on that in a later post.) I headed to my local library branch to browse and turned up quite a few likely titles. The first one I’ve finished is Moshi Moshi by Banana Yoshimoto, translated from Japanese to English by Asa Yoneda.

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Moshi Moshi follows main character Yoshie as she moves into a new apartment and forges a life for herself in the wake of her father’s death. Her father was killed in a suicide-pact with an unknown woman, and Yoshie and her mother are left to come to terms with not only his loss but also the manner of his death.

This meandering novel was easy to sink into, the narration clear, and the dialogue clean (if a bit dense at times). The characters often monologue aloud to each other in a way I haven’t encountered before, expressing thoughts and feelings that can range from nebulously philosophical, to intellectual, to seemingly inconsequential.

Small every day actions and moments make up the bulk of the narrative, to it’s benefit. As I was reading I thought rather fondly back to more melancholy times in my own life and how much things have changed for me. Though the focus is on normal life, things often seemed very dreamlike as they occurred, the passage of time taking center stage in a way that worked well to highlight Yoshie’s emotions and mental state.

I really enjoyed Yoshie’s mother as a character. She’s also trying to deal with her grief in the best way she can, and it was interesting to see how her process differed from her daughter’s. The side characters throughout the book were never delved into deeply but despite that it was clear that they had their own lives and motives beyond those known to Yoshie. Their interactions with her (and her mother) really furthered the narrative.

While the loss of Yoshie’s father is the main ‘conflict’ of this book, it also focuses well on other types of grief and the changeable nature of life itself. While this book wasn’t plot-driven, I enjoyed it all the same.

If you’re going through a life change filled with uncertainty, or are in need of some kind of literary catharsis, you need look no further than this lovely little novel.

Have you read any of  Yoshimoto’s work? Are you participating in Women in Translation month? If you have any thoughts to share, let me know in the comments below!

 

 

So You’re In A Reading Slump

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Hello folks, it’s been a while – too long, in fact. What’s been keeping me away, you ask? Well, I was in a reading slump. Considering a large part of my content consists of book reviews, the reading slump all too quickly evolved into a writing slump. And here we are.

The slump can quickly spread to various activities, and you’ll find yourself angrily eyeing your bookshelves as if they’ve personally offended you. That just isn’t a healthy attitude for a bibliophile to have for a long period of time.

My slump began when I started reading two rather daunting books at the same time. Unlike my usual simultaneous reads, both of these were books I felt I had to read with no background noise or distractions. This severely limited my reading time as well as the joy I usually find in stories I don’t have to take too seriously.

To top it off, I got a lot of my ‘wished for’ and requested books on NetGalley and Edelweiss all within the same week. Factor in the two hard reads, along with the mounting list of ARC’s I had to review, and I was getting more and more stuck.

So, you’re stuck. What do you do?

There are a few different things that may work for you, but I’ll be sharing the things that have worked for me now and in the past.

– First, stop reading the books that have you stopped up, if that’s part of your problem.

– Do a book detox – watch some episodes of a new tv show or grab a new cd to listen to. Put reading out of your mind for a little while.

– Try to re-read a favourite, preferably a short stand-alone title.

– Head to your local library to browse. Pick the first title that speaks to you and read as much as you can in the library. Sometimes a change of location helps more than you think! Try heading to a park or to the beach to read if it’s nice out.

– Read some short stories – either collections, or online tales. I’m a fan of the shorts found on Tor.com, as well as short fanfiction.

– Check out some alternative format literature: comics, plays, or audiobooks. Kickstart your love of a good story with something a little different from your usual. Try listening to some narrative podcasts.

– If there’s a list of books you have to read for review purposes, pick the one with the absolute furthest deadline. Doing something ‘wrong’ by temporarily neglecting the read coming up soonest might make the one you pick up more thrilling to finish.

So those are the different things I’ve used in the past to get out of reading slumps. This time around, I set aside my two difficult reads. I then caught up on some procedural crime dramas for a while, before picking up a book I don’t have to have reviewed until June. I’m now more than halfway through it and going strong.

Back to effortless and enjoyable reading!

Does my list include things you do? What techniques do you use to get out of a reading slump? Let me know in the comments below!

A Baffling Encounter, and a Realization

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As a fairly eclectic reader, I try to set reading goals for myself to try and avoid waffling when choosing a new book to dive into.

There was a time when I read simply for pleasure alone, diving in and out of books of paranormal romance, fantasy, and sci-fi at will. I would have five or six books on the go at time, my bag heavier than a bowling ball, my back suffering, but perfectly happy that I could choose to dip in and out whenever I wanted.

I also read a great deal of fanfiction. Starting with Harry Potter, and delving into other fandoms, I found both short and novel-length stories to whet my appetites. I loved reading about my favourite characters in new scenarios, or deeply thought out character studies, or alternate universe stories in which a single change rippled down the narrative to alter it completely.

These days, I read for more than pleasure alone. I’m a professional reader, using NetGalley and Edelweiss to read and review books before they come out, giving feedback to authors and publishers where applicable.

I also read to learn – new skills, new viewpoints, new ways of looking at the world. I read classics to learn more about the context in which they were written. I read memoirs and biographies to learn about people’s lives. I read non-fiction that can teach you how to perfectly make a bed, or forge a painting, or worship a new deity.

I was at work the other day, helping a customer, and a scenario happened that surprised and dismayed me. I work at a bookstore, and a young woman maybe a little older than me came in with a friend. They wandered the shelves aimlessly for a bit, and I overheard her say ‘it’s so hard to find something’. It was at that point that I asked if they were looking for anything specific.

Looking a bit abashed, she asked if I had any recommendations. I replied that my recommended shelf was built mostly of Young Adult books, but if she was willing to give them a try we could probably find something. She replied that she loved the Sookie Stackhouse books and would like to try and find a long series that was similar.

Thrilled, as those are on my recommended shelf, I knew of several books that she might like. After a recommendation from my shelf, we found ourselves in front of the Young Adult section with a recommendation of a long vampire and supernatural series that I was sure she would love.

It was at this point that her friend interrupted her excited questions about the series.

“Excuse me, but don’t you think this is weird?”

Confused, I asked her what she meant.

“I mean for an adult to be reading about vampires and stuff. Isn’t it just a bit juvenile? Kid’s stuff?”

I laughed, a little shocked, and proceeded to talk about the merits of different fiction, and juvenile fiction – and how they’re totally accessible to adults. There isn’t a rule that you should stop reading certain books when you hit a specific age. She persisted.

“But what if people see you reading them on transit? What will they think?”

Baffled, I replied that I didn’t care what strangers thought of me, and that I doubted her friend did either. She had no comeback for that.

Her friend bought the books I recommended, and was excited about them.

But this encounter really shook me. Is this why people struggle to find books they enjoy?

I’ve never really cared what people thought of me, so I’ll read anything under the sun that I enjoy. Will I read erotica on public transit? Or kids books? Or comic books? Or romance novels? Heck yes I will!

Why?

Because they make me happy! Or they make me think.

You should never limit what you read because of the perceptions of others. You should never limit what you read because you think that you’re not the target audience, or that a book is too ‘young’ or ‘old’ for a person of your age to be reading it.

The joy of reading should be just that – a joy. Don’t let others ruin it for you.

How do you feel about reading? What influences your book choices, if anything? What would you say to someone afraid of reading what they enjoy? Let me know in the comments below!