Fall TBR List – Top Ten Tuesday

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I’ve discovered yet another book meme, this one hosted by The Broke and the Bookish. Top Ten Tuesday is basically exactly as it sounds: participants list their ‘top ten’ of whatever the subject is every week. I thought I’d start this week since the topic is your Fall TBR list!

Generally I don’t ever have a coherent TBR, but this upcoming season seems to be the exception for me.

I don’t know that I’ll be able to read all of these, or if I’ll be adding in other reads here and there, but these are the books that I’m looking forward to getting to this season!

Goldenhand, by Garth Nix

The highly anticipated continuation of The Old Kingdom series, I cannot wait to get my hands on this and throw myself back into the fantastic world that Nix has created.

The Night Wanderer, by Drew Hayden Taylor

Chosen because I want to do some spooky reading in October, and I’m excited to read something billed as ‘A Native Gothic Novel’.

The Mad Scientist’s Daughter, by Cassandra Rose Clarke

A book I’ve been curious about since it came out, I finally came across a copy at my bookstore.  Apparently dealing with sentient rights, I’m looking forward to reading it.

My Real Children, by Jo Walton

A book about one woman’s life, and the two distinct paths it takes after a choice is made.

Invisible Planets: An Anthology of Contemporary Chinese SF in Translation, translated by Ken Liu

It’s always thrilling to read more diverse authors, and I’m so excited to take a look at the worlds created by these authors.

Children of Icarus, by Caighlan Smith

An ARC I got through NetGalley, there isn’t a lot of information about this book save that it’s based in mythology about Icarus.

The Dhow House, by Jean McNeil

Another NetGalley find, this time from Legend Press – who also published The Blackbird Singularity.

The Vegetarian, by Han Kang

A protagonist who stops eating meat and the surprising consequences of her choice.

Spider’s Song, by Anita Daher

Another spooky October read, this time not supernatural but instead dealing with more human terrors.

The Girl with All the Gifts, by M.R. Carey

Possibly another October read, I saw the movie trailer based on this book and am super intrigued about the concept.

Do we share any of the same books? What’s on your Fall TBR list?

T5W: Characters I Don’t Want To Trade Places With

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Wednesday is here again, and with it time for another Top 5! Top Five Wednesday was created by Gingerreadslainey on Youtube, and you can find the group with topics and participants here. This week the topic is characters that I wouldn’t want to switch places with. It took some thinking, but I’m satisfied with my choices.

#1 – Harry Potter

Though it would be amazing to find out I was a witch, I would never swap places with Harry. In addition to being orphaned and growing up in an abusive household, Harry must deal with fickle fame and friendships, life threatening situations, a frankly absurd prophecy, and a psychopath’s bizarre vendetta against him. Thanks but no thanks.

#2 – Clariel (The Old Kingdom)

Clariel is a young woman with simple desires. She wants not love, or fame, or the pleasures of the flesh. She simply wants to be left alone. Her heart lies with the forest and there she wishes to stay. Sadly, her wish is impeded by the machinations of those who would use her as a pawn on either side of their political conflict. Considering her journey, I would never want to take her place.

#3 – Misao Harada (Black Bird)

Cursed to live a life surrounded by malicious beings unseen to others, and later to either be eaten by them or wed to one, Misao doesn’t have a life that I envy. Certainly she thinks she has a chance at love, but would it be at the cost of her family, her friends, her life, or even her mortality? Her fate isn’t one that I would wish on anyone.

(Disclaimer: I haven’t yet finished reading the series, please no Black Bird spoilers!)

#4 – Murtagh (The Inheritance Cycle)

Enslaved and forced to fight for a terrible cause, Murtagh was born to a father who scarred him for life. Tormented by his insidious upbringing, he never becomes the principled man he used to wish he would, instead making hard choices that bring pain to himself and others. Murtagh has a hard life that I certainly wouldn’t want to be dropped into – despite the dragon companion that I would gain.

#5 – Anyone in The Hunger Games

Dystopia, anyone? Yeah, no.

What do you think of my choices? Are there other characters you wouldn’t want to trade places with?

4 Short Story Collections You Haven’t Read (But Should)!

Too often, readers don’t seek out short stories. They’re either overlooked, forgotten about, or the reader simply doesn’t know what to look for. But an excellent collection holds stories that spark your imagination and hold you just as captive as a full-length novel.

Here are some of my favourite short story collections, holding their places proudly on my bookshelves.

The Inner City by Karen Heulerthe-inner-city

This collection has the distinction of having an absolutely beautiful cover that matches the beautiful prose within. The stories within will bring you to strange places close to home and to far places that resemble home just a little too closely. Stand outs include a tale of the Rapture, a man whose gift of floating eventually takes its toll, and the story of a fish that grants wishes.

For lovers of odd sci-fi and surrealism, this book from award-winning author Karen Heuler certainly deserves your time.

 

One Good Story, That One by Thomas King

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If you haven’t read Thomas King before, this is a great introduction to his work. He’s a masterful storyteller – in a rather literal sense. Many of his stories are written as if they’re being told in the oral tradition. All of his stories have one thing in common: they feel real. Even when speaking of gods King’s work is funny and relatable, just as likely to make you laugh as it is to make you think. I can’t choose any standouts as I enjoyed everything too much.

Here’s a collection for those seeking great CanLit or clever literature.

 

Tortall and Other Lands by Tamora Piercetotall

In addition to being a short-story collection, this book is also a Young Adult title and gets looked over often for purely that reason. As anyone who has ever enjoyed Pierce’s books can tell you, that is a grave mistake. The author’s skill in world-building ensures that each tale is very immersive, and leaves you wanting more. Stand outs include the story of tree that becomes a man, the tale of a girl who defies the rules of her society to teach, and the struggle of a father forced to make a choice between his child and his culture.

This collection is for those who enjoy a great character driven story, with believable fantasy settings.

All My Darling Daughters by Fumi Yoshinaga

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This collection is a manga, and it is stunning in every way. The writing and the illustration combine to create an absolutely beautiful selection of tales that showcase the lives of different women. The narratives are touching, and the simple elegant lines of the illustrations will have you re-reading this book often. All the stories are connected, but stand outs include a daughter’s disbelief when her mother marries a (much) younger man, and a woman who turns to faith rather than love.

This book is for anyone curious about manga, and those who enjoy slice of life novels and interconnected stories.

 

Maybe you’ve read some (or all) of these? Do you enjoy reading short stories, or would you rather stick to full length novels? Did I miss one of your favourite collections?

Let me know in the comments below!