Foe

book-review-2

I’ve been eager to get out of the house a bit more of late, and in doing so have re-discovered my love of the library. This book was on display and certainly caught my eye. The enormous and deceptively simple title juxtaposed against the background of a split country scene intrigued me so I checked it out without even reading the synopsis.

Foe

Foe is narrated by Junior, a man who lives a quiet life in near-isolation with his wife, Hen. The book opens with a visit from a representative from OuterMore – an innovative company with government ties. They’ve come to offer the good news that Junior has been long-listed for an Installation that will take him away from home for years. It’s a non-voluntary (read: mandatory) trip that will separate him from his wife and throw him into completely unknown circumstances.

Iain Reid does a phenomenal job at constructing what I can only describe as a carefully clever story. Junior, Hen, and Terrance facilitate it every step of the way, providing a wonderful character study. Because there are so few characters, I was really able to focus not only on their relationships, but also on the things that made up Junior’s every day life.

I can’t go into too much detail about the plot or characters without spoiling the whole book. I will say that each character provided something valuable to the narrative. There were no unnecessary flourishes, nothing included without reason. It was an intricate and self-contained tale.

My only complaint about the book was the strange formatting when it came to dialogue. All of the characters had quotation marks around their speech except for Junior. I found it really off-putting in the beginning, not entirely sure where his speech ended and the narrative began. Even after finishing the book, I can’t see any good reason why that tactic was used and I believe it would have been better off without it.

Though I was able to guess the ending almost from the first page, I think I may be anomalous in that regard because I’ve read so many books with similar themes. Still, I enjoyed this immensely and finished it in one sitting. It’s a quiet and unassuming read that nevertheless asks some very pertinent questions about relationships and what it means to be human.

I’ll be checking out more of the author’s work, and continuing to pick up reads based purely on covers and titles to see where it takes me.

Do you have any quiet reads to recommend? Let me know in the comments below!

 

The Witches of New York

book-review-2

Earlier in the year I was eager to start a book club, not finding one in my area that I was able to join. Invites had gone out, prospective members had responded, and then I was concussed. That put the whole idea on hold indefinitely. Thankfully, I had already started a two-person book club (buddy-reading?) with the lovely Rialta Erie.

I sent her a list of books I was interested in reading, and from among them she chose The Witches of New York as our first read. It didn’t take either of us very long to realize this was going to be a very long road.

img_20190402_093149

I’ve had this book on my shelf for a while now, inevitably drawn to stories with witches.
I was certainly expecting magic to play a central role in the narrative. While that was indeed the case, this was an extremely slow-paced tale. The story centers around three women: Adelaide, Eleanor, and Beatrice. I found all of them to be equally tiresome in different ways. Their good points often lost under frustrating habits or opinions.

The plot was loosely focused on each character’s goals, with Beatrice portrayed as a savior of sorts for a new generation of witches. Adelaide and Eleanor guided her towards that fate in different and sometimes conflicting ways. I thought that the secondary characters in this book were interesting and fleshed-out enough to jog the story along when our main trio lagged.

The main antagonist, Reverend Townsend, was a wicked and contemptible man whom I deeply wanted to see dead the entire book. His scenes were by turn disgusting and discomfiting, and I would rush through them as quickly as possible. I won’t deny that McKay can write a great villainous character.

This story really had a lot of potential to be gripping but I did struggle through a lot of it. It was undeniably lovely in places; the descriptions of the teashop and the Fifth Avenue Hotel were beautiful and interesting. McKay’s descriptions of ghosts, dreams, and all manner of magical things were bright spots in the narrative. I simply found myself wishing for more magic and more of a meaty plot.

I learned small things about Adelaide, Eleanor, and Beatrice, but never enough to satisfy my curiosity. Had the story centered more on one of them as a main character rather than split between them, things may have been more fulfilling. I simply didn’t care enough about the wishes and goals of the main characters. I often found the plights and personal lives of side characters more poignant than the story itself. The most interesting side plots weren’t even resolved, to my dismay.

This isn’t a book I would re-read. If you enjoy a slow paced tale with magical elements, this may be for you. If you’re looking for something contemplative and like to fill in your own blanks, this is a winner. If you enjoy a fast-paced narrative with lore explored in more depth, this is likely not for you.

Have you read The Witches of New York? Care to recommend other witchy reads? Let me know in the comments below!

Books to Read Sans Synopsis

book-review-3

Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Thoughts on Tomes and created by Lainey @ Ginger Reads Lainey. You can check out the group’s Goodreads page for this month’s topics!

This week’s theme is books that it’s best to go into blindly. Those few titles you want to recommend without spoiling anything, and just end up describing as vaguely as possible. “No trust me, don’t google it – just read it! You’ll love it, I swear.” These books are usually fantastic if you can read them unspoiled, but even their own back covers can sometimes mar the story within. (How do publishers let that happen?)

Here are five books that I think you should read without a synopsis. Either they spoil the content a little too much or they misrepresent the story enough to make you unhappy with it. Just trust me.

Everything I Never Told You, by Celeste Ng

everything i never told you

Girl with a Pearl Earring, by Tracy Chevalier

girl with a pearl earring

Cathy’s Book, by Jordan Wiseman

cathy's book

Genesis, by Bernard Beckett

genesis-cover

Deathless, By Catherynne M. Valente

deathless

There you have it! Some of these are genre fiction, and some are not. I’ll not be telling you which is which, because that would spoil the whole point of this post. Have you read any of my choices? Do they coincide with the books you would recommend someone read without a synopsis?

Let me know in the comments below!

Dumbledore’s Army Readathon!

I believe I’ve mentioned before how cool it is to be a part of the book blogging community, but though I’ve done book memes galore and comment when I can, I haven’t quite done a true group activity.

That’s changing from January 1st to 15th, when I’ll be taking part in the Dumbledore’s Army readathon, hosted by Read At Midnight! Sign ups are open during December, so head over there and check out the details if you’re interested.

So, the #DAReadAThon is a Harry Potter themed readathon, focusing on diverse books (especially #ownvoices books). Books read and activities participated in earn you points for the house you sign up with!

Here’s my sign up card:

name-daniella

And here’s my to-read list for the readathon:

dareadathon-expecto-patronum

the-bell-jar

The Bell Jar has been on my to-read list for ages, and it’s definitely an #ownvoices book. I don’t recall ever reading a book in which the main character’s depression is centred upon, and I’m eager to do so.

 

 

 

 

da-readathon-expelliarmus

if-i-was-your-girl

 

I haven’t ever read a book with a transgender main character, but this one is an #ownvoices pick – and its supposed to be really good. Looking forward to picking it up!

 

 

 

 

da-readathon-protego

in-search-of-april-raintree

I’ve had this on my shelf for a while, but haven’t yet read it. Another #ownvoices book, there’s no better time to tackle it than during this readathon!

 

 

da-readathon-reducto

we-should-all-be-feminists

This short ebook is based on my favourite Ted Talk of all time, and I’m really looking forward to seeing it expanded upon.

 

 

 

 

dareadathon-impedimentathe-jade-peony

A former Canada Reads selection, this canlit pick has been sitting on my shelf for far too long! Another #ownvoices pick as well.

 

 

 

 

dareadathon-stupefy

the-absolutey-true-diary

I’ve had my eye on this award winner for a very long time. Another #ownvoices pick, this time also a YA title. Right up my alley!

 

 

 

 

dareadthon-lumos

Now it’s time for you to help me out! Comment below to recommend a great #ownvoices pick for me to check out during this readathon!