Books for Hufflepuffs

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Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by Sam @ Thoughts on Tomes and created by Lainey @ Ginger Reads Lainey. You can check out the group’s Goodreads page for this month’s topics!

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This week’s topic is books that represent your Hogwarts house – for me, that’s Hufflepuff. Though I admittedly look awful in yellow, I’m a proud badger! The listed choices for this week are in no particular order.

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Watership Down
As a kid I couldn’t get enough of this harrowing tale of friendship and survival. As an adult, I try to re-read it once every few years. This book shook me to my core the first time I read it. The rabbits keep on keeping on, despite all odds. What’s more Hufflepuff than that?

AsterixAsterix

That’s right, this is on the list. I grew up reading these (je suis franco-ontarienne) and love them to this day. These BD’s about a small village’s refusal of the Roman occupation is still laugh out loud funny – especially all those name puns. Asterix and Obelix have an exceptional friendship, and the resistance of their village to being conquered is earmarked by stubbornness and good humour that is characteristic of Hufflepuffs. Plus, they love a good feast!

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The Southern Vampire Mysteries

I loved these books. I sped through them faster than you’d believe (and no, I haven’t seen the show). They’re on the list because Sookie is for sure a Hufflepuff. She’s just trying to live her life and all this bizarre stuff is happening around her. What does she do? Takes it in stride, ’cause that’s life. Also, she’s a romantic who really does not react well to betrayal. Why? Because she’s a hella loyal badger.

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Maresi

A simple story told in a fairy-tale style, I really enjoyed this book. The first in a series, it follows the burgeoning friendship of two girls, Maresi and Jai. They live in the Red Abbey, a haven for females as it is forbidden for men to set food on the island. It’s a story of loyalty, community, magic, and sacrifice. Hufflepuffs can be brave, clever, and sneaky when they have to but the driving factors are always loyalty and friendship. This story has that in spades. redwall.jpg

Redwall Series

Literally all of these books capture what it means to be a Hufflepuff. The peaceful beasts of Redwall abbey extend aid to all those who ask, and live quiet lives of plenty. They live as a community with shared values and goals, and when threatened they’ll take up arms to defend their lives, though they mostly abhor violence. In far away Salamandastron there live warrior badgers who are capable of entering berserker rages and decimating throngs of vermin foes – but who live as benevolent overseers of the hares of the long patrol unless absolutely necessary. That is about as Hufflepuff as anything could ever be. Also, there are feasts. Because again, we’re ‘Puffs.

That’s all for T5W this week! Have you checked out any of the books on my list? Do you have other suggestions for Hufflepuff reads, or for books that suit your Hogwarts House? Let me know in the comments below!

 

 

 

 

 

 

T5W: Favourite Minor Characters

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Wednesday is here again, and with it time for another Top 5! Top Five Wednesday was created by Gingerreadslainey on Youtube, and you can find the group with topics and participants here.

This week the topic is favourite minor characters! This topic was pretty much made for fanfic fanatics and so I’m super pleased to participate. Every character I’ve chosen is one whose potential I think extends beyond the canon they were placed in. I’ve either written fanfic about them or read it extensively.

#1 – Leah Clearwater (Twilight)

That’s right, the very first one is a Twilight character. I’m not even sorry. The only female werewolf of known existence in the series canon is a bitter and spiteful woman who would rather spit on everyone who gives her a side-eye than consider accepting help from a friend. I love her for it. She was intensely screwed over by fate and remains strong in the face of teenage boys thinking about what a bitch she is all the time. You go girl. Live your damn life.

#2 – Fleur Delacour (Harry Potter)

Fleur is a Tri-Wizard champion and eventually becomes wife to Bill Weasley. The magical prowess that she must have had as a champion is often overlooked in favour of her Veela heritage and the general dislike that the Weasley family have for her. She’s a powerful witch who knows her own mind, eschewing those who think her silly or vain. Ain’t nobody got time for that, especially someone who can turn into a fireball-wielding bird woman or destroy you in a non-verbal duel.

#3 – Genya Safin (The Grisha Trilogy)

Genya is a Tailor, hated by her peers and superiors and doomed to a rather tragic life. While her gift is unique and arguably powerful she is made a servant and a plaything to royals who know nothing of how to love or respect their subjects. Genya does the best she can with the choices she’s been given. Beautiful and ruthless, she hides a soft and vulnerable interior and holds a torch for a man more interested in science than romance. Her story is a tragedy and she was incredible throughout it all.

#4 – Angela the Herbalist (Inheritance Cycle)

Angela is a mysterious woman of indeterminate age. A fortune-teller, witch, and herbalist accompanied by a werecat companion, the reader doesn’t learn much of her background. She knows (and sometimes follows) the customs of many races, most notably the Urgals. Is she one of the greatly diminished Grey Folk? Uncertain, but she is far older than she appears and has no issues with poisoning a whole bunch of dudes before a battle breaks out to lower the casualties on her own side.

#5 – Tolkien’s Literary Ladies

I’d also like to give a shout-out to Tolkien’s literary ladies. Eowyn, a shieldmaiden who dreams of the glory of battle and learns the truth of war. Arwen, who loves where she will though it meant she would never sail to Valinor. Galadriel, ring-bearer and one of the greatest of the Noldor. Tolkien’s canon has played host to thousands of tales about these ladies and their peers, and I’m eternally grateful for that.

That’s it for today! What do you think of my choices? What would yours be? Let me know in the comments below!

TTT: Impulsive Cover Buys (That Paid Off)

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Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by Jamie @ The Broke and the Bookish.

It’s been a while since I’ve done a Top Ten Tuesday, and this week is a cover freebie. Below are ten books that I impulse bought based solely (or mostly) on their covers. I think the saying ‘don’t judge a book by its cover’ does a terrible disservice to the folks who spend their time designing and illustrating book covers.

When I have the disposable income to do so, I’ll cover buy a few books and see how it goes. The books that made the list this week are cover buys that ended up being favourites of mine.

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Sabriel: This first instalment in a series of fantastic heroines, necromancy, and insidious magic set me on a path to seeking out more cool and unique fantasy contests.

A Certain Slant of Light: This beautiful and slightly creepy cover conceals a unique story of the afterlife that I’ve never seen replicated before or since.

Hawkeye: The colour choice and bold graphics drew me in, and this turned out to be one of the funniest comics I’ve picked up in ages.

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Annihilation: This gorgeous graphic cover is the first in a creepy and slow-moving speculative sci-fi trilogy that is absolutely unforgettable.

Sunshine: In a world where magical gifts manifest and creatures roam, the titular character is trapped with a vampire in an incredibly interesting story. The sparkly cover is rather different from the content matter, but it was certainly eye-catching.

Saga: I had no idea of the epic tale of family and space that waited for me within the pages of this excellently illustrated comic. Fiona Staples is a master.

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Kaptara: This brilliantly coloured and rendered cover conceals a hilarious story set in deep space with a distinctly 80’s vibe.

Deathless: The stark and beautiful graphic cover still doesn’t quite convey the tale of love, death, and magic that lays within the pages of this book. The story stayed with me for years.

The Gentlemen’s Alliance Cross: Arina’s Tanemura’s striking manga illustrations are densely detailed and convey her story lines wonderfully. The first in a series that I absolutely adore.

Fionavar Tapestry Omnibus

The Fionavar Tapestry: This beautiful cover introduced me to my favourite author via a series that would go on to influence both my reading and writing forever more.

That’s all for today! Have you read any of my cover picks? What theme did you choose this week? Let me know in the comments below!

 

Spring Bookish Bingo

Hello folks, I’m back! I know that last week I said that I would be back to my regularly scheduled Fanfic Feature Friday today, but I’ve just moved this week and time has gotten away from me. So come Monday I’ll be back to my regular schedule.

For now, Winter Bookish Bingo is over, but Spring Bookish Bingo has arrived! Bookish Bingo is hosted by Bekka at Pretty Deadly Blog, if you’re interested in joining. The Spring round runs from March until the end of May.

This card is very exciting – I already have a whole bunch of ideas of what I’d like to fill the squares with! Once again, I’ll be trying to fill the whole card.

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Some ideas I’m kicking around for the various categories:

Scary: The Dead-Tossed Waves, Survive the Night

Blue Cover: The Silmarillion, It Started With Goodbye

Magic: Roar

Over 500 pages: Edgar and Lucy

PoC On Cover: The Prey of Gods

Non-Fiction: The Right to Be Cold

2017 Debut: Maud

Witches: A Great and Terrible Beauty

That’s all for now!

If you have suggestions for the other categories, let me know. If you’re choosing different reads for those categories I’d love to know your picks. Comment below to weigh in.

Update 2: Winter Bookish Bingo

We’re almost through with Winter Bookish Bingo, so I thought I’d post another quick update on how I’m doing. Find my last update here. Bookish Bingo is hosted by Bekka at Pretty Deadly Blog.

Categories with a snowflake are ones that I’ve read for so far. The books read since the last update are listed below!

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Sequel: Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo

Own Voices: If I Was Your Girl by Meredith Russo

GR Choice Nominee: Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo

Blue Cover: The Djinn Falls in Love

Cover Buy: Shadow and Bone by Leigh Bardugo

Set Abroad: Giant Days Vol 1.

So, no new bingos since my last update, but still a fair amount of reading got done! I have a few categories left, but I don’t think I’ll be filling out any more squares. I’m currently reading The Silmarillion and Edgar and Lucy – neither of which fit into any of these categories. They’re both quite long as well so it remains to be seen if I’ll have time to read anything else before February comes to an end.

Are you participating in Winter Bookish Bingo? How are you doing so far? Let me know in the comments below.

Looking Forward: Big Titles

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There has been some cool book news recently, so I thought I would link it up in case you hadn’t heard of these yet. It’s certainly going to be an exciting year for readers, and it’s only just beginning! Here are some big titles I’m really anticipating.

On May 4th, Beren and Lúthien will be found at a bookstore near you. When I first heard about this, I assumed that it would be a complete narrative with new material from Tolkien’s notes. Understandably, I was pretty thrilled. While that isn’t quite what this book will contain, it’s close enough that I’ll pick up a copy anyway.

From the publisher:

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In this book Christopher Tolkien has attempted to extract the story of Beren and Lúthien from the comprehensive work in which it was embedded; but that story was itself changing as it developed new associations within the larger history. To show something of the process whereby this legend of Middle-earth evolved over the years, he has told the story in his father’s own words by giving, first, its original form, and then passages in prose and verse from later texts that illustrate the narrative as it changed. Presented together for the first time, they reveal aspects of the story, both in event and in narrative immediacy, that were afterwards lost.

I’m currently reading The Silmarillion, so I may try a complete read of Middle-Earth titles before I tackle this new book.

Next!

If you haven’t heard about The Book of Dust – well, I’m about to fix that.

Phillip Pullman’s His Dark Materials was an absolute dream of a trilogy. Kid me read my copies until they were ragged, and as an adult I gained even more insight when I went back for a re-read. If you haven’t yet explored worlds with Lyra and Pantalaimon, I strongly urge you to pick up a copy of The Golden Compass and dive in. (But disregard the terrible film of the same title. Please.)

For those of you who read and enjoyed HDM – rejoice! On October 19th of this year, the first of The Book of Dust trilogy will be released.

From Pullman’s website:

So, second: is it a prequel? Is it a sequel? It’s neither. In fact, The Book of Dust is… an equel. It doesn’t stand before or after His Dark Materials, but beside it. It’s a different story, but there are settings that readers of His Dark Materials will recognise, and characters they’ve met before. Also, of course, there are some characters who are new to us, including an ordinary boy (a boy we have seen in an earlier part of Lyra’s story, if we were paying attention) who, with Lyra, is caught up in a terrifying adventure that takes him into a new world.

I will definitely be doing a His Dark Materials re-read later in the year to prepare for this release! It will be really cool to see an older Lyra, and learn more about Dust as well.

Are you looking forward to these new releases? Will you be pre-ordering, or biding your time for a library copy? What other 2017 releases are you waiting for? Let me know in the comments below!

The Djinn Falls in Love & Other Stories

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Anthologies are tricky things. You may miraculously jive with all of the authors contained within, and find that their myriad of voices washes over you like a cool breeze. You may pick and choose your favourites, skimming some tales and immersing yourself deeply in others. Even still, you may find that none of the voices are ones you’d care to hear, and regret the whole experience entirely.

When I saw this title on NetGalley, I admit that I requested it solely for the story by Nnedi Okorafor. I thought that if she had a story here, then that would act as a quality barometer and I would surely love the others as well.

It didn’t quite work out that way.

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The Djinn Falls in Love is a collection of stories about – you guessed it – Djinn. More widely known to the western world as genies, most people unfamiliar with their origins associate them with Disney’s Aladdin; a rather gregarious blue entity who lives in a lamp and grants wishes.

Well, I don’t think I have to tell you that Disney often grossly misrepresents things from other cultures.

I rarely quote book summaries in my reviews, but in this case I think it really says it best.

“Imagine a world filled with fierce, fiery beings, hiding in our shadows, in our dreams, under our skins. Eavesdropping and exploring; savaging our bodies, saving our souls. They are monsters, saviours, victims, childhood friends. Some have called them genies: these are the Djinn.

And they are everywhere. On street corners, behind the wheel of a taxi, in the chorus, between the pages of books. Every language has a word for them. Every culture knows their traditions. Every religion, every history has them hiding in their dark places.”

My interest was undeniably piqued by that fantastic description of this anthology, and of the Djinn. I tucked into this book with relish, and found that I wasn’t as wowed as I expected to be. Perhaps my expectations were simply too high, considering that most of these authors were award winners.

For the most part my reaction to this collection was ‘meh’. I wasn’t able to engage with most of these stories emotionally, and that’s a huge part of enjoyment for me. Sometimes it was the characters, sometimes the writing style, and sometimes there just wasn’t a satisfying payoff by the end of the tale.

Still, there were a few stories that I really enjoyed. Those were: History (Nnedi Okorafor), The Congregation (Kamila Shamsie), Black Powder (Maria Dahvana Headley), The Jinn Hunter’s Apprentice (E.J. Swift), Bring Your Own Spoon (Saad Z. Hossain), and The Spite House (Kirsty Logan).

Apart from those stories I found this book to be more of a slog than I anticipated. It got to the point where I would be reluctant to pick it up because I knew I’d have to read through many stories I wasn’t into to get to one that I would enjoy. Still, an anthology is always going to be a mixed bag, so I knew what I was getting into.

I don’t regret reading this, though had I not been required to write a review I probably would have skimmed most of this instead of reading.

I would recommend it those who already enjoy one or many of the authors contained within, or those who are supremely curious about Djinn.

Are you anticipating the release of this anthology? Let me know in the comments below!